🎁 FREE GIFT + 🚚 FREE SHIPPING  ON ORDERS $100+

Lavender Planting Guide

For centuries, lavender has been grown to provide pleasing scents for homes (dried flowers were used in wreaths and arrangements), clothing (sachets helped offset the casual personal hygiene habits common in the Middle Ages) and bath products (bath oils, soaps and lotions widely available today.) There are lots of online sources for instructions and recipes if you're inclined to try your hand at any of these endeavors, or simply enjoy the flowers as they are produced over many weeks in your garden.

Success Snapshot

PLANTING
DEPTH

Pre-Potted

WATER
QUANTITY

Low

SUNLIGHT
QUANTITY

Full Sun

PLANTING
PROXIMITY

18-24" Apart

BLOOM
SEASON

Summer

HARDINESS
ZONES

Zones 5-9

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Lavender prefers soil that is lean, well drained and requires a site that's on the dry side during the winter months.
  2. Site your lavender plants where they'll get full day sun. Very light shade will also work in regions where the sun is especially strong.
  3. Check the mature size and spacing information provided with each lavender variety and lay out your plant placement accordingly. Dig holes and situate the plants so that the soil level on the root ball from the pot is even with that in your bed. Tuck the plants in and tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets.
  4. After planting, water generously to settle to soil around the plant. Root and top growth will develop quickly and you'll likely see new leaves forming in two to three weeks. Speed of growth is dependent on soil and air temperature; the warmer the temperature, the faster the growth. Provide supplemental water, as needed in the spring and summer; about 1" per week is a good general estimate. The soil can be allowed to dry out in the late fall and winter. Keep in mind that occasional deep waterings are better than frequent lighter drinks.
  5. Flowers develop during the summer and last for weeks. Cut flowers for arrangements or crafts when they are just beginning to open.
  6. Feel free to trim your plants to shape them at any time of the year. Do not prune to the ground, however, as lavender plants are woody and need some foliage to survive.
  7. In late fall, your lavender's foliage may dry and fade with the onset of colder nights. If you live in an area where the weather stays warm year round, just trim out dead stems or spent flowers to keep your plants looking their best. Your lavenders will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle in spring.

Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Select large containers, keeping in mind the mature size of your lavender plants. (See individual cultivar descriptions.) Fill your containers with well-drained, lean potting soil to which some sand or small gravel has been added. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes in your pots; lavender must never sit in waterlogged soil.
  2. Site your lavender plants where they'll get full day sun. Very light shade will also work in regions where the sun is especially strong.
  3. Check the mature size and spacing information provided with each lavender variety and lay out your plant placement accordingly. Dig holes and situate the plants so that the soil level on the root ball from the pot is even with that in your bed. Tuck the plants in and tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets.
  4. After planting, water generously to settle to soil around the plant. Root and top growth will develop quickly and you'll likely see new leaves forming in two to three weeks. Speed of growth is dependent on soil and air temperature; the warmer the temperature, the faster the growth. Provide supplemental water, as needed in the spring and summer; about 1" per week is a good general estimate. The soil can be allowed to dry out in the late fall and winter. Keep in mind that occasional deep waterings are better than frequent lighter drinks.
  5. Flowers develop during the summer and last for weeks. Cut flowers for arrangements or crafts when they are just beginning to open.
  6. Feel free to trim your plants to shape them at any time of the year. Do not prune to the ground, however, as lavender plants are woody and need some foliage to survive.
  7. In late fall, your lavender's foliage may dry and fade with the onset of colder nights. If you live in an area where the weather stays warm year round, just trim out dead stems or spent flowers to keep your plants looking their best. Your lavenders will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle in spring.