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Spring Shipping Schedule According To Your Climate Zone

Phlox Planting Guide

Phlox are quintessential garden classics relied on for generations to provide bushy clumps of fragrant color in a wide range of mix and match shades. These flowers are also excellent for easy bouquets; just snip a half dozen big flower heads, drop them in a medium to large vase of water, add a few fern or hosta leaves for greenery and you're done. Now, close your eyes and inhale. Ahhhh. Whether you choose types that have been grown in countless gardens for years or some from the new line of disease resistant cultivars, these are beauties no perennial garden should be without. Pure and simple, phlox are a joy to grow and have available for cutting.
Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Phlox won't thrive in areas where the soil is soggy.
  2. Site your plants where they'll receive full sun to light shade. Phlox plants may need a little extra shade in areas where the sun is very strong. In these regions, partial shade is preferred.
  3. To protect against powdery mildew (a white, flour-like substance that sometimes develops on the foliage) allow space for good air circulation between your phlox plants and their neighbors.
  4. Your plants will be shipped "bareroot". This just means that the soil has been washed from the roots while the plant is in a dormant state. Bareroot plants are easy to handle and settle in quickly. Tuck your phlox into the ground with the roots pointing downwards. Fan them out a bit and situate the growing points, the site where new sprout will originate, at soil level. Space Volcano phlox plants about 14 - 16" apart and other varieties, which grow larger, 24 - 30" apart.
  5. After planting, water your phlox generously to settle the soil around the roots. Top growth forms in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperature.
  6. Water periodically during the growing season if rain does not occur, keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. Avoid overhead watering or watering at night which can promote conditions conducive to mildew. An estimate of 1" of moisture per week is a good, general place to start.
  7. When your phlox bloom feel free to snip stems for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants, phlox flowers are exceptional for arrangements and for some varieties snipping blossoms prolongs the blooming period.
  8. In late fall, your phlox foliage will fade and wilt with the onset of cooler weather. At this point you may clip the stems to within 2" of the ground with the knowledge that next spring will bring fresh growth. If you live in an area where the weather stays warm year round, just trim out the dead stems or spent flowers to keep your plants looking their best until fresh growth begins to appear in the spring.
  9. Your phlox will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.

Planters, Pots, Tubs and Urns
  1. Select large containers keeping in mind the mature size of your phlox. (Volcano phlox mature to a more manageable size that do other types, so they're the best choice for containers.) Fill your containers with well-drained, humus rich potting soil. Add peat moss or perlite to improve drainage, if needed. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes in your pots; your phlox must never sit in waterlogged soil.
  2. Site your plants where they'll receive full sun to light shade. Phlox plants may need a little extra shade in areas where the sun is very strong. In these regions, partial shade conditions are preferred.
  3. To protect against powdery mildew (a white, flour-like substance that sometimes develops on the foliage) allow space for good air circulation between your phlox plants and their neighbors.
  4. Your plants will be shipped "bareroot". This just means that the soil has been washed from the roots while the plant is in a dormant state. Bareroot plants are easy to handle and settle in quickly. Tuck your phlox into the ground with the roots pointing downwards. Fan them out a bit and situate the growing points, the site where new sprout will originate, at soil level. Space Volcano phlox plants about 14 - 16" apart and other varieties, which grow larger, 24 - 30" apart.
  5. After planting, water your phlox generously to settle the soil around the roots. Top growth forms in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperature.
  6. Water periodically during the growing season if rain does not occur, keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. Avoid overhead watering or watering at night which can promote conditions conducive to mildew. An estimate of 1" of moisture per week is a good, general place to start.
  7. When your phlox bloom feel free to snip stems for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants, phlox flowers are exceptional for arrangements and for some varieties snipping blossoms prolongs the blooming period.
  8. In late fall, your phlox foliage will fade and wilt with the onset of cooler weather. At this point you may clip the stems to within 2" of the ground with the knowledge that next spring will bring fresh growth. If you live in an area where the weather stays warm year round, just trim out the dead stems or spent flowers to keep your plants looking their best until fresh growth begins to appear in the spring.
  9. Your phlox will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.