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Grape Hyacinth Planting Guide

Garden Pearls
Like clusters of tiny white and blue pearls, grape hyacinths are ideally suited for decorating the edges of gardens, containers and paths. Think of them as affordable jewelry for your landscaping. We've heard these little flowers compared with the delicate work found in Faberge eggs and seen up close, the resemblance is understandable. For those inclined to snip a few small flowers for a bedside bud vase, you'll want to make sure these petite treasures are available. Many even offer a light, grapey scent to confirm that winter has past and spring really has arrived. And blues - well, these are some of the best true blues in the gardening world. Combine their color, cost and constitution and you'll agree that these belong in every garden.
PLANTING
DEPTH

3-4 Inches

WATER
QUANTITY

Light to Moderate

SUNLIGHT
QUANTITY

Full sun to half day sun

PLANTING
PROXIMITY

4 Inches Between Planting

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. While grape hyacinths aren't fussy about soil, they will not survive in soggy soil or standing water.
  2. Site your grape hyacinths where they will get good light - full or three quarter day sun will produce the best blooms.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 3-4” deep and 3” apart. The bulbs are round, with small points on the sides that should be placed facing up.
  4. After planting, water well to settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots and foliage form in the fall. Flowers form in the spring.
  5. When in bloom, feel free to cut grape hyacinth flowers for tiny, perfect bouquets. This will not hurt your plants.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. Late in the spring the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. The foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.
  8. Grape hyacinths will self seed and spread over time. Most gardeners love this tendency to naturalize. Eventually crowding may occur and flowering activity may decline. If this happens, dig up the bulbs and separate them. Distribute them around your garden or share your bounty with friends. Replant promptly. These plants typically perform beautifully for many years.


Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Use tall or shallow containers; grape hyacinths work well when mixed with other petite flowers, like pansies or miniature daffodils, or when tucked around the ankles of taller plants.
  2. Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; grape hyacinths must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot.
  3. Site your grape hyacinths where they will get good light - full or three quarter day sun will produce the best blooms.
  4. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 3-4” deep and 3” apart. The bulbs are round, with small points on the sides that should be placed facing up.
  5. After planting, water well to settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots and foliage form in the fall. Flowers form in the spring.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut grape hyacinth flowers for tiny, perfect bouquets. This will not hurt your plants.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate
  8. Late in the spring the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. The foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.