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Spring Shipping Schedule According To Your Climate Zone

Ginger Planting Guide

Gingers are a large and varied clan with diverse flower forms, exotic color combinations, scented blossoms and foliage and far away lands of origin. Because, in part, of their diversity and unusual looks these beauties offer a pleasing touch of the tropics year round in warm climates or seasonally, tucked into containers on patios and porches in cooler parts of the country. Looking to spark up your plantings? Take a closer look at gingers.
Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Gingers prefer soils with average amounts of moisture and will not thrive in areas that are soggy. Also, gingers will not fair well in salty, ocean side soils so avoid these.
  2. Site your gingers where they will receive full sun to partial shade. These plants thrive in sunny sites in foggy coastal areas or where ample water will be provided. If water will be limited, sites with one-third to one-half day of shade are preferable. Temperatures of 65 degrees Fahrenheit and above are ideal.
  3. Plant your ginger rhizome with any roots pointing downwards and the "eyes" or growing points just below the soil surface. If your rhizomes have clipped leaf stalks allow these to protrude above the soil line. Space plants 30"-36" apart. Tuck the plants in and tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets.
  4. After planting, water your ginger generously to settle the soil around the root. Root and top growth form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperature.
  5. Water periodically during the growing season as needed, keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. An estimate of 1" of moisture per week is a good place to start. Gingers appreciate a monthly feeding of any balanced (10-10-10) fertilizer.
  6. Should your ginger flower, feel free to to snip blossoms for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and many types are exceptionally fragrant.
  7. After blooming has finished for the year, leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the plant for the future. As the weather cools, these plants grow at a slower pace and need less fertilizer. Water infrequently during the fall and lightly during the winter. In zone 7, foliage will freeze but roots will resprout in the spring. Winter temperatures in zone 6 and cooler require that you bring your plants indoors and provide them with a bright window site. Return outdoors when spring weather warms to 55 or more at night.
  8. Your ginger plant will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle in the spring.


Planters, Pots, Tubs and Urns
  1. Choose a large container and consider adding other plants to provide varied textures and colors. Gingers are good mixers. Fill the container with fertile soil that drains well. Gingers prefer an average amounts of moisture and will not thrive in pots that are soggy.
  2. Site your gingers where they will receive full sun to partial shade. These plants thrive in sunny sites in foggy coastal areas or where ample water will be provided. If water will be limited, sites with one-third to one-half day of shade are preferable. Temperatures of 65 degrees Fahrenheit and above are ideal.
  3. Plant your ginger rhizome with any roots pointing downwards and the "eyes" or growing points just below the soil surface. If your rhizomes have clipped leaf stalks allow these to protrude above the soil line. Tuck the plants in and tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets.
  4. After planting, water your ginger generously to settle the soil around the root. Root and top growth form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperature.
  5. Water periodically during the growing season as needed, keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. An estimate of 1" of moisture per week is a good place to start. Gingers appreciate a monthly feeding of any balanced (10-10-10) fertilizer.
  6. Should your ginger flower, feel free to to snip blossoms for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and many types are exceptionally fragrant.
  7. After blooming has finished for the year, leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the plant for the future. As the weather cools, these plants grow at a slower pace and need less fertilizer. Water infrequently during the fall and lightly during the winter. In zone 7, foliage will freeze but roots will resprout in the spring. Winter temperatures in zone 6 and cooler require that you bring your plants indoors and provide them with a bright window site. Return outdoors when spring weather warms to 55 or more at night.
  8. Your ginger plant will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle in the spring.