Spring Shipping Schedule According To Your Climate Zone

Calla Planting Guide

In Warm Regions Callas Can be Planted in Autumn
Callas possess a simple, elegant grace that undeniable. Each blossom is a soft, fluid twist perched atop a strong, straight stem. The bloom's sculptural qualities belie the ease with which you can grow your own florist quality cut flowers. And what a bargain! For the price of a single florist's calla stem you can have a bulb that will produce 10-25 flowers season after season. Now's the time to get your callas for next summer in the ground.
PLANTING
DEPTH

top 1/4 of bulb exposed above soil line

WATER
QUANTITY

Moderate during active growth, dry summer dormancy

SUNLIGHT
QUANTITY

Partial shade

PLANTING
PROXIMITY

12 Inches Between Planting

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Callas will not thrive in water logged soil.
  2. Site your callas tubers where they will receive filtered light or moderate shade. Calla lilies will burn in full sun.
  3. Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. The tubers tend to have a rounded side and one filled with growing points or "eyes". Plant with the eyes facing upwards.
  4. After planting, water the callas well, gently soaking the soil and settling it around the bulbs. Roots and top sprouts will form in the autumn in warm regions. Flowers are produced in the spring and summer.
  5. When in bloom, feel free to cut calla flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow callas.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the tubers for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.


Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; anemones bulbs must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot.
  2. Site your callas tubers where they will receive filtered light or moderate shade. Calla lilies will burn in full sun.
  3. Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. The tubers tend to have a rounded side and one filled with growing points or "eyes". Plant with the eyes facing upwards.
  4. After planting, water the callas well, gently soaking the soil and settling it around the bulbs. Roots and top sprouts will form in the autumn in warm regions. Flowers are produced in the spring and summer.
  5. When in bloom, feel free to cut calla flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to add callas to gardens and containers.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the tubers for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.