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GLADIOLUS - (HARDY) Planting Guide

No Love/Hate Relationship Here
Gardeners tend to have a love/hate relationship with gladiolus - those tall spires of huge colorful blooms. Some gardeners see "stunning!", others, "funeral flowers". These hardy glads - nanus gladiolus - represent glads we all can love. Topping out at just 28", these dwarf varieties have a slightly different flower form - just different enough that it doesn't trigger that negative reaction. Further, their slight stature makes them stand straight and strong despite windy conditions, and a natural for containers.
PLANTING
DEPTH

4 Inches

WATER
QUANTITY

Light in active growth to dry conditions in dormancy

SUNLIGHT
QUANTITY

Full sun

PLANTING
PROXIMITY

5-6 Inches Between Planting

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. While glads aren't fussy about soil, they will not survive in soggy soil or standing water.
  2. Site your plants where they will receive full sun.
  3. Dig holes and plant the corms 4" - 6" deep and about 4" - 6" apart. Plant the bulbs with the flattened side down and the growing point facing up. Group in clusters or 10 or more for a beautiful display. Many growers plant glads at two-week intervals to extend the blooming season.
  4. After planting, water your hardy glads well.
  5. Water periodically during the growing season if rain does not occur, keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. About 1" of water per week is a good estimate of the amount needed during active growth periods.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut glad stems for bouquets. If you want to include foliage in your arrangements cut sparingly as these leaves are needed to nourish the bulb for next year's show.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed. Leaves and stalks may be removed when they yellow.


Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Start with a large container and fill with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. While glads aren't fussy about soil, they will not survive in soggy soil or standing water.
  2. Site your plants where they will receive full sun.
  3. Dig holes and plant the corms 4" - 6" deep and about 4" - 6" apart. Plant the bulbs with the flattened side down and the growing point facing up. Group in clusters or 10 or more for a beautiful display. Many growers plant glads at two-week intervals to extend the blooming season.
  4. After planting, water your hardy glads well.
  5. Water periodically during the growing season if rain does not occur, keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. About 1" of water per week is a good estimate of the amount needed during active growth periods.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut glad stems for bouquets. If you want to include foliage in your arrangements cut sparingly as these leaves are needed to nourish the bulb for next year's show.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed. Leaves and stalks may be removed when they yellow.