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Spanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides) Planting Guide

Shop Spanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides)
Thank you, Spain!
Hyacinthoides

These unfussy members of the lily family are native to Spain and Portugal and we couldn't be happier to have them in gardens here in the States. Pretty, inexpensive, good for cutting, unfussy about light and soil, and able to thrive on neglect, they'll earn their keep in any garden. If you're just getting started with bulb gardening, this is a great place to begin. For gardeners who really know their way around a trowel, you'll like these, too. First-rate naturalizers, Spanish bluebells reproduce by developing small offsets (baby bulbs) on the sides of the mother bulbs. They also produce seeds, allowing them, over time, to fill in and create ever larger patches of spring brilliance. Great plants for difficult garden sites, just think how Spanish bluebells will respond to more hospitable conditions.



Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2-3 inches to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. If in doubt, give it a try - these bulbs are more forgiving of poor soil than most.
  2. Spanish bluebells thrive in a variety of light conditions, from full sun to partial shade to dappled shade. Once established, they'll even do nicely in dry shade, a tough site for most plants.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 4” deep and 4” apart. Position the bulbs with the pointy end facing up.
  4. After planting, water well to settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots will form in the autumn. Leaves and flowers will develop in the spring.
  5. When in bloom feel free to cut flowers for colorful bouquets. This will not hurt the plants.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. By early to mid summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. The foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.
Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Use tall or shallow containers and plant to leave the bulbs in place for several seasons. Spanish bluebells prefer not to be moved. Mix with daffodils, like Golden Bells or Ice Follies, varieties that perform well in both cold and warm climates, with Asiatic lilies, and/or with low growing Oxalis.
  2. Spanish bluebells thrive in a variety of light conditions, from full sun to partial shade to dappled shade. Once established, they'll even do nicely in dry shade, a tough site for most plants.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 4” deep and 2-3” apart. Position the bulbs with the pointy end facing up.
  4. After planting, water well to settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots will form in the autumn. Leaves and flowers will develop in the spring.
  5. When in bloom feel free to cut flowers for colorful bouquets. This will not hurt the plants.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulb for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. By early to mid summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. The foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.




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