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Scilla Planting Guide

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Glorious Blues
Scilla

Most gardeners love blue. It mixes brightly with pinks and whites, and contrast crisply with yellows and golds. The scilla family offers some of the best blues to be found anywhere. From the giant, eye-catching blue of Scillia Peruviana to the smaller, carefree blues of tubergeniana and blue-purples of amethystine these sparklers belong in every garden that celebrates spring. Help yourself!

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2-3 inches to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Scilla bulbs need to have good drainage and will not grow well in water logged soils.
  2. Scilla thrive in a variety of light conditions, from full sun to partial shade to dappled shade. Site your bulbs where they will receive good light. Check individual product pages for additional exposure information.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 3-4" deep and 4" apart. The bulbs are rounded, with small points on the tops; these points should be placed facing up.
  4. After planting, water well to settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots will form in the autumn. Leaves and flowers will develop in the fall for Peruviana and in the spring for other varieties.
  5. When in bloom feel free to cut flowers for colorful bouquets. This will not hurt the plants.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. By early to mid summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. (Peruviana leaves often stay green year round.) The foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.
Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. For Peruviana, use large containers and plan to leave the bulbs in place for several seasons so they can develop into big clumps. For other spring blooming varieties of scilla, plant in containers with other bulbs that flower early in the season like Ice Follies or Golden Bells daffodils.
  2. Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; scilla bulbs must not sit in water logged soil or they will rot.
  3. These bulbs thrive in a variety of light conditions, from full sun to partial shade to dappled shade. Site you bulbs where they will receive good light.
  4. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 3-4" deep and 4" apart. The bulbs are rounded, with small points on the tops; these points should be placed facing up.
  5. After planting, water well to settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots will form in the autumn. Leaves and flowers will develop in the fall for Peruviana and in the spring for other varieties.
  6. When in bloom feel free to cut flowers for colorful bouquets. This will not hurt the plants.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  8. By early to mid summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. (Peruviana leaves often stay green year round.) The foliage may be removed at this point. Your bulbs will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.




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