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Nerine Planting Guide

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Don't Let the Season End
Nerine

If spring is the most exciting season for gardeners, fall may be the saddest. Plants slip into dormancy, beds begin to look barren and another chapter in your book of gardening is about to end. Not ready to toss in the towel? Fight back. Choose plants that are in their glory in September and October and keep the color coming. If that's your plan, include nerine.









Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2-3 inches to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost or ground bark all work well and are widely available. These bulbs really appreciate well drained, even course, gritty soil. They must never sit in quite moist or waterlogged soil or they will rot.
  2. In hot regions, site your nerine where they will receive morning sun and afternoon shade. Elsewhere, full sun produces good results.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs with their necks and about an inch of the bulb above the soil surface. The top of the bulb is the part that looks a little like the stem area of an onion. Plant about 8-10" apart.
  4. Nerine bulbs develop strappy foliage that gathers sunlight and strengthens the plants during the spring and early summer. Flower stalks develop in the fall. Provide generous water when the plants are actively growing and very little when the plants are dormant.
  5. Feel free to cut flower stems for bouquets. This will not hurt your plants and the cuts are long lasting indoors.
  6. After your nerine have finished blooming, cut off any remaining spent flower stalks. Your plants will rest for a few months before sending up new foliage in the spring. If you live in an area where these bulbs are not winter hardy, pull up your bulbs, clean off any soil and allow to air dry for a day or two. Store in a cool, dry place in slightly damp peat moss. Replant in the spring.
  7. Over time your nerine will form sizeable clumps. These plants like to be crowded so don't feel compelled to divide them unless flower production decreases. At that point clumps can be dug, split apart and moved to other parts of the garden or shared with friends.
Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Fill your container with soil that drains well. It's fine if the soil is even course or a bit gritty. They must never sit in moist or waterlogged soil or they will rot.
  2. In hot regions, site your nerine where they will receive morning sun and afternoon shade. Elsewhere, full sun produces good results.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs with their necks and about an inch of the bulb above the soil surface. The top of the bulb is the part that looks a little like the stem area of an onion. Plant about 8-10" apart.
  4. Nerine bulbs develop strappy foliage that gathers sunlight and strengthens the plants during the spring and early summer. Flower stalks develop in the fall. Provide generous water when the plants are actively growing and very little when the plants are dormant. For containers that are attractive early in the season consider planting nerine with Eucomis Reben or Eucomis Tugula Jade, Ismene or annuals that like half day sun.
  5. Feel free to cut flower stems for bouquets. This will not hurt your plants and the cuts are long lasting indoors.
  6. After your nerine have finished blooming, cut off any remaining spent flower stalks. Your plants will rest for a few months before sending up new foliage in the spring. If you live in an area where these bulbs are not winter hardy, pull up your bulbs, clean off any soil and allow to air dry for a day or two. Store in a cool, dry place in slightly damp peat moss. Replant in the spring.




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