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Black Eyed Susan/Rudbeckia Planting Guide

Shop Black Eyed Susans/Rudbeckia
Late Summer Lovelies
Rudbeckia

Spark up your late summer garden with gold, russet and mahogany daisy-like blooms. From mid July thorough frost Black Eyed Susans step up to provide blasts of richly hued, straight stemmed flowers, ideal for anchoring listless garden beds and for snipping to create effortless summer bouquets.

Easy, dependable and happy in a wide range of settings, Black Eyed Susans belong in every sunny garden. Simply choose the height and color combination best suited to your individual situation.






Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. While lack eyed Susans aren't fussy about soil, they will not thrive in areas that are soggy.
  2. Site your plants where they will receive full sun. Very light shade is also fine in regions where the sun is especially strong.
  3. Check the mature size and spacing information provided with each plant variety and design your placement accordingly. Dig holes and situate the plants so the soil level on the root ball from the pot is even with the soil in your bed. Tuck the plants in and tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets.
  4. After planting, water your black eyed Susans generously to settle the soil around the root ball. Root and top growth form in a few weeks, depending on soils and air temperature.
  5. Water periodically during the growing season as needed keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. An estimate of 1" of moisture per weeks is a good place to start.
  6. When your black eyed Susans flower feel free to snip blooms for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and for some varieties it prolongs the blooming period.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the plant for the future. Water as needed.
  8. In late fall, your plants' foliage will fade and wilt with the onset of colder nights. At this point you may clip the stems to within 3" of the ground. Fresh growth will develop in the spring. If you live in an area where the weather stays warm year round, just trim out dead stems or spent flowers to keep your plants looking their best.
  9. Your black eyed Susans will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle. Rudbeckia grow larger over time developing into clumps. These clumps may be divided by slicing them in half vertically with a sharp shovel. Replant the pieces elsewhere in your garden or share with friends. Divide in the fall every few years, if you like.
Planters, Pots, Tubs and Urns
  1. Select large containers keeping in mind the mature size of your black eyed Susans. (See individual cultivar descriptions.) Fill your containers with well-drained, humus rich potting soil. Add peat moss or perlite to improve drainage, if needed. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes in your pots; your plants must never sit in waterlogged soil.
  2. Site your plants where they will receive full sun. Very light shade is also fine in regions where the sun is especially strong.
  3. Check the mature size and spacing information provided with each plant variety. When planting in containers it's helpful to lay out your plant placement a little snugger than is recommended for beds, to create a full display. Dig holes and situate the plants so that the soil level on the root ball from the pot is even with that in your container. Tuck the plants in and tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets.
  4. After planting, water your black eyed Susans generously to settle the soil around the root ball. Root and top growth form in a few weeks, depending on soils and air temperature.
  5. Water periodically during the growing season as needed keeping in mind that weekly deep waterings are better than lighter drinks every day or two. An estimate of 1" of moisture per weeks is a good place to start. Modify as needed depending on your individual situation.
  6. When your black eyed Susans flower feel free to snip blooms for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and for some varieties, prolongs the blooming period.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the plant for the future. Water as needed.
  8. In late fall, your plants' foliage will fade and wilt with the onset of colder nights. At this point you may clip the stems to within 3" of the ground. Fresh growth will develop in the spring. If you live in an area where the weather stays warm year round, just trim out dead stems or spent flowers to keep your plants looking their best.
  9. Your black eyed Susans will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.




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