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Agapanthus Planting Guide

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If You Love True, Clear Blue . . .
Agapanthus

Agapanthus can be counted on to produce some of the best blues in the summer garden, with big flowers comprised of up to 100 tiny tubular florets and framed by deep green, strap-like leaves. Available in many shades, from azure to cobalt to midnight, the flowers of this South African plant provide clear, brilliant color over many weeks and after blooming has past, seed heads develop which can be used for winter arrangements. While agapanthus vary in their degree of winter hardiness, in areas colder than zone 8 most of these beauties are best grown in containers and brought indoors during the winter.

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Agapanthus will not survive in soils that are water logged.
  2. Site your agapanthus where they will receive full sun. These plants will grow in light shade but tend to develop stronger stems in brighter light.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 2" deep and 4-6" apart. Position the bulbs with the pointy end facing up.
  4. After planting, water well, gently soaking the soil to settle it around the bulbs. Roots and top growth will form in a few weeks. Provide only enough supplemental water in the spring and summer to keep the soil lightly moist; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate. The soil can be allowed to dry out in the fall and winter.
  5. When in bloom, feel free to cut these brilliant flowers for striking arrangements.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, creating food through photosynthesis and strengthening the bulb for the future. Water lightly, if at all during the fall and winter. In cold areas, bring your plants indoors when night temperatures begin to drop to the low 40s.
  7. Your agapanthus will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle. Any foliage that yellows may be removed.
Planters, Pots, Tubs, Urns and Windowboxes
  1. Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; agapanthus bulbs must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot.
  2. Site your agapanthus where they will receive full sun. These plants will grow in light shade and tend to develop stronger stems in brighter light. Agapanthus are great container plants for pool or patio edges and around deck perimeters.
  3. Dig holes and plant the bulbs 2" deep and 4-6" apart. Position the bulbs with the pointy end facing up.
  4. After planting, water well, gently soaking the soil to settle it around the bulbs. Roots and top growth will form in a few weeks. Provide only enough supplemental water in the spring and summer to keep the soil lightly moist; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate. The soil can be allowed to dry out in the fall and winter.
  5. When in bloom, feel free to cut these brilliant flowers for striking arrangements.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, creating food through photosynthesis and strengthening the bulb for the future. Water lightly, if at all during the fall and winter. In cold areas, bring your plants indoors when night temperatures begin to drop to the low 40s.
  7. Your agapanthus will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle. Any foliage that yellows may be removed.




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