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Chionodoxa Planting Guide

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Lawn Stars
Chionodoxa

Chionodoxa are small starry flowers that appear in early spring, just when a jot of rich color is so welcome. These bulbs produce some of the clearest blues in all of horticulture and are happy to naturalize in gardens across much of the country. Plant in random groups in your lawn for colorful flowers in early spring. By the time your lawn is growing tall enough to need cutting, the flowers will have bloomed and the foliage will have gathered the sunlight needed to replenish the bulbs for next spring's show. And over time, the chionodoxa bulbs will multiply and spread so the bright patches will increase in size and intensity. Lovely lawn stars!

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Chionodoxa will not thrive in water logged soils.
  2. Site your chionodoxa where they will receive full to half day sun. 
  3. Dig holes and plant the chionodoxa 3" deep and 2-3" apart. The bulbs are small and rounded, with slight pointed tops - plant with the points facing upwards.
  4. After planting, water well to gently settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots will form in the autumn. Buds and flowers are produced in the early spring.
  5. When in bloom, enjoy the colorful little flowers. They're bright, cheery and so welcome in the spring.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulbs for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. In late spring or early summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. Foliage many be removed at this point. Your chionodoxa will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.
Pots, Barrels, Tubs & Urns
  1. Find a large container and fill it with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; chionodoxa bulbs must never sit in water logged soil or they will rot. 
  2. Site your chionodoxa where they will receive full to half day sun. 
  3. Dig holes and plant the chionodoxa 3" deep and 2-3" apart. The bulbs are small and rounded, with slight pointed tops - plant with the points facing upwards.
  4. After planting, water well to gently settle the soil around the bulbs. Roots will form in the autumn. Buds and flowers are produced in the early spring.
  5. When in bloom, stop and enjoy these colorful little stars.
  6. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight, create food through photosynthesis and strengthen the bulbs for the future. Water as needed during active growth periods; about 1" of moisture per week is a good estimate.
  7. In leate spring or early summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy. Foliage many be removed at this point. Your chionodoxa will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.




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