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Calla Planting Guide (spring planted varieties)

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Garden Return on Investment (ROI) Your Broker Will Bless
Calla Lily

If you love calla lily flowers, become your own florist. It's easier than you might think. And a first rate bargain.

Considering that calla lilies grow from funny-looking knobby tubers it's difficult to believe that each will produces 10-30 elegant sculptural flowers. But they do and the color selection is outstanding. These flowers sell for $5-$9 a stem at florist shops. The best calla tubers - proven varieties, giant two-year old bulbs in their productive prime, from the world's premier stock grower - cost about $6 each. For the cost of a single florist's flower, you can have more than ten times that many garden-fresh stems, in colors your florist would love to offer. Any way you want to calculate, that's impressive ROI.



Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2"-3" to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Callas thrive in average to moist soil but will not survive in soggy settings.
  2. Site your callas where they'll receive full sun to bright filtered light.
  3. Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. Look for the sides of the tubers that appears to have the most "eyes" or growing points, which look much like the eyes on a potato. Plant the tubers with the eyes facing up.
  4. After planting, water your callas generously to settle the soil around the tubers. Roots and sprouts will form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperatures. (If temperatures are still cool in your area, wait until they warm before planting. Or start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms. Callas sulk in cold soil.)
  5. Water your callas enough to keep the soil slightly damp but never enough for it to be soggy.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut calla lily flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow these beauties.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show. Water as needed. Leaves may be removed when they yellow. (In cold areas, to save your calla tubers for next year, dig them after the first frost. Let the tubers air dry for several days. Then store in a cool location in paper bags or boxes filled with peat moss.)
  8. Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.
Planters, Pots, Tubs and Urns
  1. Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; calla tubers must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot. Keep in mind the mature size of the varieties you have chosen and plan your container sizes accordingly.
  2. Feel free to mix callas with other plants in the same container. Just keep in mind that all must have the same light and water needs.
  3. Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. Look for the sides of the tubers that appears to have the most "eyes" or growing points, which look much like the eyes on a potato. Plant the tubers with the eyes facing up.
  4. After planting, water your callas generously to settle the soil around the tubers. Roots and sprouts will form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperatures. (If temperatures are still cool in your area, wait until they warm before planting. Or start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms. Callas sulk in cold soil.)
  5. Water your callas enough to keep the soil slightly damp but never enough for it to be soggy.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut calla lily flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow these beauties.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don't cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show. Water as needed. Leaves may be removed when they yellow. (In cold areas, to save your calla tubers for next year, dig them after the first frost. Let the tubers air dry for several days. Then store in a cool location in paper bags or boxes filled with peat moss.)
  8. Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.




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